Monday, July 15, 2013

Mind Over Platter

After not having had the pleasure of seeing him in awhile, I ran into a local shopkeeper outside of a Dunkin’ Donuts earlier this summer. The second-to-last time I saw him was nearly 2 years ago. I hadn’t seen him in awhile then either, and he told me I looked bigger than before, that I must be eating too much. He urged me to take up fasting. (When his shop later went out of business, he worked at the store across the street from it - until that outfit tanked too.)

Yesterday, I texted with a friend about her Ramadan routine. For medical reasons, she’s not fasting this year but her husband (the one who prodded me into creating this blog) sure is and I’m a little scared to call or text him when he’s not eating. Everybody should be scared to call, text, or approach me in any way if I haven’t semi-recently chewed or sipped on something. I’m not the lady at the party who will respond to an antipasti tray set before her at 9 p.m. with a flippant, “Oh good, I haven’t eaten since 10 o’clock this morning.”

I intensely dislike the feeling of being hungry (for food, that is; I can take those other forms of hunger that merely confirm you’re alive and underwhelmed with stagnation), and used to handle anyone undergoing a fast with awe, insisting that I wouldn’t be able to do what they’re doing. Except I probably could, as long as I reduced my physical activity level and really applied myself during the nighttime bingeing opportunities. I’ve lost count of all the things I once said or thought I could or would never do until the time came when there wasn’t much of a choice but to do anything otherwise. 

5 comments:

  1. When my daughter lived in Morocco for six months, she observed Ramadan in action. She said that during the fasting daylight hours, people were short-tempered and argumentative. Sometimes fights broke out in the street. Then, with the breaking of the fast in the evening, people stuffed themselves into a coma, sometimes throwing up,and then they had trouble getting up in the morning.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would almost call that cheating.... Humans will never change :)

      Delete
  2. I am like you. I can't go longnwithout snacking on something. But recently when I was ill - and my activity levels were nil - I ended up not eating or hardly eating for a fortnight. And I didn't miss it all. So it looks like your comment about activity levels is the key to it. I certainly couldn't carry on normally as so many Muslims do at this time. My hat goes off to them.
    P.S. Are you still speaking to the man who told you you were bigger? I know my wife wouldn't be!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I still speak to and enjoy running into him (although I rarely see him anymore)! He's so friendly, in that way the sincerely kind, but socially derelict, often are.

      Delete
  3. @The Roving Retorter,

    Outside of a Dunkin' Donuts. Oh, the irony.

    I used to fast once a week when I was younger and healthier. Maybe I should revisit since I'm much "bigger than before", too.

    ReplyDelete